10 weird things for a Spaniard in Izmir (CHECK OUT!)

Hello guys! Hola, coleguitas! Salut les amis!

MERHABALARRRRRRR

Here you have a list of the things that a little Spanish finds totally surprising on the Turkish daily life. To which of the following points do you also agree?  Leave me a comment! (Not mentally, a physical probe, please).

1. LIFTS ARE NOT IN THE CORRECT FLOOR

You always need to go up or down. This magic machine that helps us arriving to places when we are tired or there are just too many stairs for an early morning, opens its doors in a ‘semi-floor’ that I hated since the first day when I needed to take my heavy luggage with me and I found out that some more stairs were waiting for me.

To sum up: you are force to excercise in Turkey.

 

2. TAKING SHOES OFF IN EVERY SINGLE HOUSE YOU VISIT (INCLUDING YOURS)

This one can be more or less suprising if you are used to Asian culture or if your house floor in England is full of carpets. However, for me it is very stressful. I agree it is much more hygienic, but imagine you have a hole in your socks or your have directly no socks. It becomes a nightmare putting shoes in and off 500 times in a day.

3. BUYURUM, BUYURUM!

This is the sound that you may hear at all times in every single street of İzmir. Seller welcome you this way and trust me, it sticks in your brain until the point of no return. I spend all day joking with my flatmates about that trying to imitate them.

4. PEOPLE NOT WAITING FOR OTHERS GETTING OFF THE PUBLIC TRANSPORT

After living in London, I really see this as very impolite. They prefer to jump on you rather than waiting two seconds until all the ones who wanted to leave the metro are our of the carriage. In these situations I feel my killer instinct raising at high levels.

5. PEOPLE STAND ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF THE METRO STAIRS

Amazing, wonderful, bravo! HARIKAAAAAAAAA TÜRKIYE!

I would have never expected this Londiner thing in Izmir. People can kill you entering the metro, but hey! Respect for the stairs, kanka!

 

6. USING ‘EAU DE COLOGNE’ AS A ‘DISINFECTANT-AROMATIC-SOAP’

Turkish love to put it all the time on their hands to refresh themselves. Actually, we have always one bottle in the office. A very funny situation that happened to me was going in a restaurant and suddenly the waiter (typical Turkish old man) came with a huge bottle of super strong cologne and he started to pour it on the hands of my friends and I was like… what’s happening? Is this a kinds of baptism ritual? Free shower? Or what?

 

7. PASTA IS EATEN WITH YOĞURT

 

There is no other option in native houses. You choose: eating pasa ‘a palo seco’ or with yoğurt.

Then, as I don’t want to choke I prefer the second one. Just to save my life with some trace of liquid.

 

 

 

 

8. ÇAY, ÇAY, ÇAY AND MORE ÇAY!

Tea ıs life. I have never drank so much tea before coming here as I hate hot drinks as a premise. he same with Turkish kahve, such a strong taste, no mılk at all and if you ask for sugar, you are weird.

9. THERE ARE PHONE APPLOCATIONS TO READ THE COFFEE FORTUNE

The obsession for the future in this country is that much that they have developped technology for this. You drink your coffee, you take some pictures of the remains and you wait around 10 minutes for the result. Here you go! Your fortune is read!

10. PEOPLE DON’T SAY SORRY WHEN THEY BUMP INTO YOU

Another reason to go crazy in this country. I was used to say sorry 500 times a day in London. Even if you don’t touch the person, you are already saying sorry just in case. Or if it is the other one touching you, you also say sorry because ‘you were in the middle of their way’ at some point. I realized I came back to Spain with this ‘fake politeness syndrome’ and yet it didn’t dissapear. Spain is not the best example neither, but at least we say sorry. In İzmir I can be pushed into the floor and no one will say sorry (LOL, I hope in this case yes… hahahaha). Fingers crossed anyway! We never know!

 

 

🙂

About Macarena Gonzalez Lopez

Hola, holita kankas of the world! This is Maka, best known among my friends as “La muchacha turca” because of my love for this country, where now I have the pleasure to live in. I am 25 years old and I come from a super touristic town in amazing Málaga, called Fuengirola. Even if I am Spanish, people agree I perfectly look Turkish and THIS MAKES ME ÇOK ÇOK ÇOK MUTLU. I studied Translation and Interpreting (EN-ES-FR) at Universidad de Málaga and some classical music in the conservatory of my town. Definitely, not a science girl at all. I hate cucumber and I love Eurovision Song Contest.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.